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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. bob orr on the fury over n.s.a. surveillance. the stock market makes history. anthony mason on what's driving today's numbers. and whatever happened to the people of the inferno? elaine quijano one year after hurricane sandy torched a neighborhood. >> it's a disgrace that we waited this long. captioning sponsored by cbs captioning sponsored by cb this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the head of the agency that oversees the government's health insurance web site appeared before congress today. marilyn tavenner, the administrator of the centers for medicare and medicaid services apologized for all of the problems with the site. she placed the blame on tardy contractors. that did not satisfy members of the house committee who were frustrated when tavenner would not answer some of the key questions. nancy cordes on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy. >> reporter: scott, the main thing members wanted to know was how many americans have managed to navigate this system and actually sign up for insurance. they asked her dozens of times, but she wouldn't
the n.s.a. has long spied to friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie ""casablanca--" my god, there's gambling going on here poopts the same kind of thing. >> reporter: national security agency chief keith alexander said european partners have not been shy about spying on the u.s. alexander was questioned by minnesota republican michele bachmann. >> is it your experience that allies of the united states have spied on the unite
out about that today? >> reporter: scott, it seems n.s.a. is getting far more aggressive than it's been in pushing back of these stories based on the leaks, specifically n.s.a. chief keith alexander denied the "washington post" report which claimed that the u.s. government is using some kind of secret back door or back doors to routinely scoop up millions of communication records from users of yahoo! and google. alexander made point of saying that n.s.a. does get information from those internet search companies but only through court orders. >> pelley: bob orr in our washington newsroom. thank you, bob. in egypt, a top leader of the muslim brotherhood was arrested today by the military government, it's part of the crackdown on brotherhood which advocates a strict islamic government. he went in to hiding when the military ousted president muhammad morsi. since then islamic militants have stepped up attacks on christians and clarissa ward is in cairo with that. >> reporter: in a packed church in a poor cairo neighborhood, the mourners grieve for their dead. five christians mowed do
and they're partnering with brazil, another country enraged by n.s.a. spying in order to craft one. and it would be the strongest condemnation of u.s. surveillance to date. >> pelley: margaret brennan at the state department for us tonight. we asked chief white house correspondent major garrett to try to find out how widespread the spying has been and how much the president knew. major? >> reporter: scott, u.s. intelligence agencies have conducted surveillance on 35 world leaders. today we learned president obama knew of some of these operations but not others. top officials tell us the the president does not demand as a rule intelligence on european or south american leaders but does when it comes to places like iran, syria, and north korea. the u.s. surveillance dragnet was so wide the president and top members of congress did not know allies like german chancellor angela merkel were targets. president obama has promised merkel the u.s. will never again tap her personal cell phone-- something it had been doing since 2005. but other surveillance will continue-- with new limits. we
that german chancellor's phone was being listened into by the nsa the white house said the president didn't know about that. now that we've seen all the testing of the affordable care act computer system that crashed before october 1, the white house says the president didn't know any of that was happening. how does the president not know about these things? >> there is so much information that comes into the white house. and it seems as this continues to role out that very few people knew, if anyone knew the breadth of this challenge. and so, so why would you not bring it to the president? well, if the white house staff really didn't know how bad it was, and my sense is that's probably the case, then you wouldn't say to the president, oh, we think this is screwed up. >> pelley: what point does the president say this is the most important thing my administration has ever done, we're going roll this computer system out on october 1. this better go well. >> the biggest challenge in any white house is the myriad of issues and the numbers that come before you. so-- it doesn't surprise me that
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)